Frequently Asked Questions

 

1. Organization


How is ONVIF organized?

ONVIF, founded by Axis Communications, Bosch Security Systems, and Sony Corporation, is a non-profit organization that acts on behalf of members to facilitate the standardization of interfaces for effective interoperability of IP-based physical security products. ONVIF consists of a Steering Committee, Technical Committee, Technical Services Committee, and Communication Committee. General management and voting procedures follow established terms of reference for open standards initiatives and are defined in the Rules of Membership. The committees can establish working groups to accomplish tasks related to their work.


What are the roles and responsibilities of committees and working groups?

The work in ONVIF is driven and carried out by its members in various committees and working groups. The Steering Committee is responsible for the organization’s overall strategy and budget. The Technical Committee drives the development of the ONVIF core specification as well as the technical direction and roadmap. Working Groups under the TC include Core WG, Security WG, Physical Access WG and Video Enhancement WG. The Technical Services Committee is responsible for the development of test specification, test tool and conformance process. Working Groups under the TSC include: Device Testing WG, Client Testing Workgroup, Profile Q WG, Profile A WG, Advanced Streaming Profile Proposal WG and Developers’ Plug Fest Task Force. The Communication Committee is responsible for the organization’s external and internal communication.


2. Membership


Currently how many members does ONVIF have?

ONVIF has a robust member base on six continents comprised of leading camera, video management system and access control companies. Click here for a complete member list.


Who can join ONVIF and how do I become a member?

As an open forum, membership is available to all companies and organizations who wish to participate in the activities of ONVIF, e.g., device manufacturers, software vendors, integrators, consultants and end users within the security industry. See Rules of Membership.


What membership levels are available? And what are the responsibilities and privileges when participating in the forum?

ONVIF offers four levels of membership: user, contributing, full and observer member, to accommodate individual choices of participation. Full or contributing members can actively influence the development of the standard by participating in the work of the forum. The user member level is open to organizations that wish to use the Network Interface Specification and have access to specification proposals but do not want to participate in any work of the forum. The Observer member level is best suited for the Press, having access to conformance tools and the ONVIF logo. Technology and test tools will be made available to all ONVIF members to facilitate the development of conformant products.


What are the costs involved (membership fees) for participating?

ONVIF offers four levels of membership with costs attributed accordingly. Details of the costs involved are clarified in the Rules of Membership available for download. The purpose of the membership fees is to cover the administration costs related to the non- profit organization and other costs directly related to the forum.


Who can use the ONVIF logo?

Only ONVIF members have the right to use the ONVIF logo. The logo can be used to promote their membership and conformant products. The usage of the ONVIF logo must follow the logo guidelines provided by ONVIF. The ONVIF logo guidelines are available to all members through Members’ Area.


3. Technology


How do I know as an integrator if a device supports, for instance, the imaging services?

ONVIF requires a defined set of web services that are used by ONVIF devices and clients. Furthermore, some services are conditional, e.g. if a camera has PTZ functionality it is mandatory to provide that service in the ONVIF interface. Optional services are also defined. A product must report what services and capabilities it supports. In terms of development, it is quite straightforward since a software client can query an ONVIF device to provide a list of the services and capabilities it provides. For instance, the imaging service is an optional service and a Client can query the availability of the service on a device via the GetCapabilities method of the device management service. This means that the integrator can handle detection of what a product provides automatically in its software.


A certain brand-name network video device, which is ONVIF Profile S conformant, also supports other brand-specific functionalities. Will these functionalities work with ONVIF 
Profile S conformant clients?

Not necessarily. All ONVIF profiles have a defined set of functionalities that must be supported by a device and a client. Functionalities that are brand-specific to a product are not supported by ONVIF profiles. In the case above, the brand-specific functionalities will work only if the client also incorporates support for the product’s brand-specific functionalities. If this is the case, then the system can use both the ONVIF interface for functionalities defined by the ONVIF profile and the brand-name product’s interface for the brand-specific functionalities.

 

4. Products and Conformance


How does ONVIF conformance work?

Conformance to a particular ONVIF profile is based on self-declaration by ONVIF members for their manufactured products, according to a conformance process (based on a test specification and a test tool). The conformance process specification and the test specification are available under Profiles & Specifications menu. The test tool is available for members only under the password-protected Members’ Area. The decision of using/deploying the standardized ONVIF interface will be made by each manufacturer being a member of the forum. The scope of ONVIF is interface standardization of the network layer of IP security devices. Product development and roadmaps are in the hands of individual companies and are not in the scope of ONVIF. ONVIF lists conformant products.


How can I tell if a product is ONVIF conformant?

The only way to verify that a product has been declared to be ONVIF conformant (by ONVIF) is via the ONVIF conformant products page. ONVIF DOES NOT provide certificates of conformance or other guarantees of conformance. Products that have been verified to be ONVIF conformant via the ONVIF conformance process are able to utilize the appropriate Profile mark on that product.


Is it possible that two products that are ONVIF conformant will not work together?

The products should work together. However, a manufacturer might have chosen not to implement a certain optional function in a product. It is not enough that one product supports that optional function; so in such cases, the function cannot be used. It is also important to understand that the conformance process is a self-certification test done by the manufacturer, and not conducted by ONVIF. In the event that two products do not work together, it is quite probable that it is not the quality of the specification in itself that causes integration problems, but rather the product quality, i.e. the quality of the implementation of the specification. It is important to stress that the ONVIF specification does not make any claims about the quality of the products. The responsibility for making good quality implementations of ONVIF falls heavily on the manufacturers, and the market forces should take care of this over time. To minimize the risk for flaws in the specification, there are activities in ONVIF during the development of the specification where prototyping is done to ensure that the quality of the specification is good.

 

5. Standardization


Why is there a need for standardization in IP-based physical security market and what is the 
benefit for customers and other manufacturers?

The overall goal is to make it even easier for end users, integrators, consultants and manufacturers to take advantage of the possibilities offered by IP-based physical security solutions. A standardized interface for IP-based physical security products enables integrators and end users to easily integrate products from different vendors into a single solution. The standardization helps software vendors to secure that their products support various brands of IP-based physical security products. For device manufacturers, standardization ensures interoperability of products from different manufacturers.

An open standard within the IP-based physical security industry helps drive the convergence from analog to digital solutions, thus making the benefits of IP-based physical security products and solutions available to everyone. Read more about the benefits.


What do you mean by an “open standard”?

The specifications are approved by a formalized committee that is open to participation by all interested parties. The specifications will also support other industry standards in, for example, video compression, network streaming and device discovery.


Does ONVIF cooperate with other international standardization bodies in the industry such as IEC & SIA, in order to avoid having several formats?

ONVIF has started open discussion with several international standardization organizations. On June 3, 2014, the Security Industry Association (SIA) and ONVIF signed a Memorandum of Understanding toward the further development of IP-based interoperability standards in access control. As part of the relationship, ONVIF will provide support to SIA & OSDP IP extension initiative, while SIA will provide education to its membership and industry stakeholders of Profile C and other ONVIF PACS (physical access control system) activities. Each group will appoint an official representative to liaise with the other group for the purposes of increased information sharing and collaboration. ONVIF has established liaisons with ISO JTC1 HEVC, also known as H.265 and IEC Technical Committee 79, Alarm and electronic security systems. ONVIF is currently referred to in the international standards IEC62676 Video Security Systems, IEC IEC62580-2 CCTV in trains and in the ongoing work in IEC TC79 WG 11, Electronic access control systems which has produced a new International Electronic Access Control standard, IEC 60839.

 

6. Physical Access Control


As a physical access control company, why should I join ONVIF?

Joining ONVIF right now allows you to actively get involved in the development of the global open standard for the interface of IP-based physical security products. Being an ONVIF member gives access to specification proposals and the test tool, and also allows the use of the ONVIF logo to market conformant products. Full and contributing members can also actively influence the development of the standard as part of committees and working groups.


Why has ONVIF extended the scope to include physical access control systems?

ONVIF is a global and open industry forum that is committed to standardize communication between network devices and ensure interoperability between network products for the security market. In March 2010, ONVIF decided to extend the scope to include physical access control systems. The goal of the extension is to standardize communication between access control devices as well as to ensure interoperability between network video products and access control systems. Many companies, including several ONVIF members, see a great need for such a standard as it would bring benefits to system integrators, manufacturers and end users alike:


What are the objectives of having a standard for physical access control systems?

The objectives include:


What are the benefits of an open standard for physical access control systems?

The benefits include:

For system integrators:

For manufacturers:

For end users:


How will this scope extension influence the current structure of ONVIF?

To facilitate the integration of network video devices and access control systems by using a global open standard, ONVIF Rules of Membership has been amended, and the goal of ONVIF is officially “Driving IP-based physical security through global standardization”. Each ONVIF member will have the flexibility to select the membership scope depending on the technical area(s) they would like to participate in. In other words, current ONVIF member can choose to remain a network video member, or to extend its membership to include access control areas. New ONVIF member can choose to be in either one of the areas, or in both network video and access control areas. Other than that, new working groups in ONVIF Technical Committee – including Scope Extension Working Group and Physical Access Control System (PACS) Working Group, have been set up to define the extension to the ONVIF specification for PACS. The main goal is to cover the basic access control functionalities that will enable interoperable solutions for physical access control systems provided by different vendors under the ONVIF specification. The ONVIF Network Interface Specification Set contains multiple documents describing the basic ONVIF services for device discovery, device management and events. For each service, there will be a Service document that contains an introduction as well as a functional service description.